About

About

[vc_row full_width=”stretch_row_content_no_spaces”][vc_column][parallax_image fullheight=”large” position=”head-center” border=”1″ bgtype=”mask-dark op7″ image_url=”90″ title=”ABOUT US” contentm=”This book discusses five disasters or near-disasters of the early Jet Age, experiences which shook the industry, regulators and public out of early complacency and helped build a more realistic foundation for safer air transportation.”]Deadly Turbulence[/parallax_image][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row css=”.vc_custom_1469896484180{margin-top: 120px !important;}”][vc_column offset=”vc_col-lg-offset-2 vc_col-lg-8″][vc_column_text]

ABOUT THE BOOK

Dedicated to the 42 Onboard Braniff International Flight 250. On 6-Aug-1966, Braniff 250, a British Aerospace BAC-1-11 twin jet, registration N1553, was ripped apart by horizontal wind shear 5,000 feet above the Antone Schawang farm northeast of Falls City, NE, killing all 42 on board. Their story is told in the book, Deadly Turbulence: The Air Safety Lessons of Braniff Flight 250 and Other Airliners, 1959-1966, published by McFarland.

Jet airliner operations in the U.S. began in 1958, bringing, it was thought, a new era of fast, high, safe, smooth, sophisticated travel. But almost immediately, the new aircraft were involved in incidents and accidents that showed jets created new problems even as they solved old ones. This book discusses five disasters or near-disasters of the early Jet Age, experiences which shook the industry, regulators and public out of early complacency and helped build a more realistic foundation for safer air transportation. They include:

  • • Pan American 115 (North Atlantic, 1959)
  • • Northwest 705 (Miami, 1963)
  • • United 764 (O’Neill, NE, 1963)
  • • Eastern 304 (New Orleans, 1964
  • • Braniff 250 (Falls City, 1966)

The book takes a particularly detailed look at the 1966 destruction of Braniff International Airways Flight 250 in Nebraska. Nearly two years of CAB/NTSB, scientific, and meteorological inquiry helped advance the understanding of jet operations in severe weather and saw the first use of Cockpit Voice Recorder technology in an aviation accident investigation.

In addition, a University of Chicago professor, Dr. Tetsuya “Ted” Fujita, conducted a more intensive investigation of the weather system which downed Flight 250. Over time, Dr. Fujita’s already extensive knowledge of thunderstorms and tornadoes led to his creation of the Fujita Scale of Tornado Intensity, the F-scale that we hear about so frequently during storm season.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][/vc_row]